Silence(d) is Golden (mosaic)…

Geminivirus particle: characteristic doubled icosahedron containing a single ssDNA (courtesy Russell Kightley)

About that title…I read in my Nature News on the iPad about the use of siRNA in transgenic beans to silence expression of the Bean golden mosaic begomovirus, and I irresistibly thought of this…B-)

To serious matters – said article reported the following:

“Brazilian scientists roll out a transgenic pinto bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) engineered to fend off one of the crop’s most devastating enemies: the golden mosaic virus. Approved on 15 September by the Brazilian National Technical Commission on Biosafety (CTNBio), the transgenic bean uses RNA interference to shut down replication of the virus [reported originally in Mol Plant Microbe Interac in 2007].”

This paper reported the following:

“…we explored the concept of using an RNA interference construct to silence the sequence region of the AC1 viral gene and generate highly resistant transgenic common bean plants. Eighteen transgenic common bean lines were obtained with an intron-hairpin construction to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing against the AC1 gene. One line (named 5.1) presented high resistance (approximately 93% of the plants were free of symptoms) upon inoculation at high pressure (more than 300 viruliferous whiteflies per plant during the whole plant life cycle) and at a very early stage of plant development. “

OK, some background: Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) is a begomovirus, a representative of the largest genus of the Geminiviridae, and one of the more devastating viral plant pathogens on the planet.  It is a single-stranded circular DNA virus with a very distinct particle morphology, which replicates its genome by a rolling circle mechanism shared by all geminiviruses, nanoviruses, circoviruses, microviruses and pretty much any other ssDNA virus, as well as some plasmids.

RNA silencing – once known as post-transcriptional gene silencing, before the field was usurped by non-plant virologists – is a natural mechanism used by plants in particular as an adaptive immune response to plant viruses, as well as to control gene expression.  It is a complicated process, involving the formation of double-stranded RNAs from complementary sequences, transcribed from DNA or RNA genomes, which are then chopped up into shorter 21-25 base-length sequences.  These small interfering (si) RNAs are dissociated, and are free to bind to complementary sequences in the plant cell cytoplasm – and target them for degradation by a particular set of enzymes.  This happens frequently in transgenic plants, where the desired over-expression of a particular gene may be frustrated by the plant promptly silencing it.  It is also part of an arms race between plant viruses and plants, with nearly all plant viruses demonstrating some ability to interfere with siRNA silencing.

Geminiviruses are no exception: a number of papers have explored silencing suppression by geminiviruses, with a review by Dave Bisaro prominent among them.  Who is also famous for singing “Born to be Wild” in a Spanish karaoke bar in 1994 with a number of other geminivirologists, who called themselves “Subgroup IV” – but I digress.

It is interesting, then, that one can make transgenic plants expressing siRNA specific for a geminivirus gene – and get silencing of viral expression, and effective immunity to the virus: this would seem to have potential for a deathmatch, with the plant trying to silence virus-coded RNA, while the virus tries to suppress RNA silencing by the plant…as well as the fact that it is a DNA virus, and silencing is mediated at the level of cytoplasmic RNA.

But it obviously works – and probably because the siRNA is being expressed constitutively, meaning the virus infecting the first cell(s) gets shut down before it has a chance to get expression going.  The choice of gene – the “AC1″ or Rep – is also important, as expression of mRNA from this is at a very low level, and it is crucial for virus genome replication.  This means that shutting it down stops any DNA replication from occurring.

So Viva! Brasil, Viva! as we South African are fond of saying.  Southern hemisphere rules geminivirus resistance, OK…because we have more than a passing interest in the same phenomenon…B-)

About these ads

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “Silence(d) is Golden (mosaic)…”

  1. maysaa el sayed zaki Says:

    This is really nice article

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 619 other followers

%d bloggers like this: